chrysanthemum pattern

I began with the question: When I visit Kyoto, should I purchase a tofu server made using the kiku-dashi (chrysanthemum pattern) technique?

img src=kanaamitsuji

I ended with the realization: I can apply a sort of kind of similar technique to all the messy wires around our place.

img src=lowcommitmentprojects

Still thinking about what I really want to take away from the Japan trip coming up in three weeks with some inspiration from the New Yorker: Initially, Muji included only forty different products, mainly food and household goods. Today, it is an independent two-billion-dollar company, selling more than seven thousand items ranging from furniture to soap. It keeps prices low by paying close attention to processing and packaging (most of Muji’s paper products are unbleached), and by using undesirable and industrial materials, which are cheaper in bulk (it once famously sold “U-Shaped Spaghetti,” made from the discarded ends of pasta).

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