grateful (COUNT=1397)

1. He shared this picture with me
Him: Looks at the cute owls
Me: Why do you think they are owls?

2. Discussing Big Salt with Blair @ Taverna Mercatto; maybe South Core is okay after all!

3. Watching Big Chill (his mum’s fav movie): I often wonder whether I am more honest with friends made recently or friends I’ve known for decades; it’s probably easier to question the here and the now with old friends since we have a common frame of reference; at the same time perhaps we feel compelled to be consistent with the person we once were

4. Coffee with Tanya @ Crafted by Te Aro followed by

5. Ava Roth @ Loop Gallery followed by

6. Walking along Bloor Street like we used to

img src=???

no like button

Pinterest is killing off its ‘Like’ button and I think this is the best idea ever. I was thinking of liking Teresa’s Pin. Instead, I will blog it!

When I think of Chinese design, I think of mottled shades of brown and gray with a touch of red. Less stylized than Japanese design but more comforting. Yet most places in China these days is a mess of color a la Times Square. This Pin gives me hope that Chinese design will return to its roots.

img src=claraalcott

10% complete

Untitled

My year of traveling without traveling: 10% complete. I tried watching LeRoy’s Waterloo Bridge but couldn’t stand the melodrama. I did enjoy Rossen’s Alexander the Great. Mum & Dad are visiting Greece this September.

I’m happy to be in Toronto.

A stop light was installed at Yonge & The Esplanade. In general, I dislike stop lights since they suggest that I need to stop. But this one suggests that I stop and gaze at the CN tower. The next part of my daily walk to work is through the Calatrava Galleria which always always sends my thoughts soaring.

On weekends, we walk through smaller streets with smaller structures but there is always something engaging if we choose to be engaged.

arrival


img src=flixist.com

Busy at work but took Sunday off to watch Arrival. I started the film thinking this is like Space Odyssey and finished thinking this is as anti as can be.

In my interpretation of Space Odyssey, the monolith represents human nature, which is beyond good and evil. Is using a bone as a weapon to drive rivals away from the water hole good or evil? Neither because it is human to want to ensure our own survival.

In Arrival, monolith x 12 is here to unify humanity. Personally, I think things worked out because the aliens worked with 12 nations independently. If they only sent one monolith, they would not have had the opportunity to test 12 different approaches. Yes, different people doing different things will create conflict and conflict will create winners and losers at least in the short term. In the longer term, the rival ape men might find a bigger water hole elsewhere.

In terms of cinematography, I loved every moment of Arrival. So I’m sort of hoping that I misunderstood the message and the film is not suggesting that we all unify around THE RIGHT ANSWER. Otherwise, I think Arrival represents everything that is wrong with the world. When people try too hard to grasp the truth, they find themselves bound by narratives created by others.

this holiday season (COUNT=1342)

This holiday season, we visited his parents (and walked along the icy Georgian Trail). We visited my parents and progressed through my dad’s DVD collection.

Bullets over Broadway was quite hilarious. Gattaca fulfilled his need for Frank Lloyd Wright architecture and my need to watch my favorite movies over and over again. We watched the meticulous cleaning of glass at Neo. Always great coffee.

I picked up chicken liver at Chinatown. I also picked up some cute cards at Type Books.

Walking through Crown Flora + Greenhouse Juice Co

Me: Should we buy a plant for the bedroom?
Him: We should get rid of something first

img src=archdaily

la la la (COUNT=1322)


img src=discreetcharmsandobscureobjects

Well it’s half way through November

Time to start thinking about new year’s resolutions and I’m thinking 2017 can be the year to travel without traveling. For example, I can finally upload all my pictures of La Paz while humming La La La.

Of course, I will continue to travel to St Louis for work and we will continue to visit his family in Collingwood. But other than that, I can simply sit on my couch and read about an artist who wanders the streets of Oslo. Or watch movies of different places from different times.

My dad gave us a subset of his DVD collection and we started with Los Angeles: Altman’s Short Cuts. Because Carver’s writing is somewhat minimalist, I never imagined his characters to live in LA but somehow the setting really works. Instead of trying to describe the movie (the little stubbornness, the big cruelty and so on), I think a section of wikipedia captures the feel.

The following excerpt from Scott Driscoll’s review of Maryann Burk Carver’s 2006 memoir describes the decline of Maryann and Raymond’s marriage.

The fall began with Ray’s trip to Missoula, Mont., in ’72 to fish with friend and literary helpmate Bill Kittredge. That summer Ray fell in love with Diane Cecily, an editor at the University of Montana, whom he met at Kittredge’s birthday party. “That’s when the serious drinking began. It broke my heart and hurt the children. It changed everything.”

“By fall of ’74”, writes Carver, “he was more dead than alive. I had to drop out of the Ph.D. program so I could get him cleaned up and drive him to his classes”. Over the next several years, Maryann’s husband physically abused her. Friends urged her to leave Raymond.

“But I couldn’t. I really wanted to hang in there for the long haul. I thought I could outlast the drinking. I’d do anything it took. I loved Ray, first, last and always.”

Carver describes, without a trace of rancor, what finally put her over the edge. In the fall of ’78, with a new teaching position at the University of Texas at El Paso, Ray started seeing Tess Gallagher, a writer from Port Angeles, who would become his muse and wife near the end of his life. “It was like a contretemps. He tried to call me to talk about where we were. I missed the calls. He knew he was about to invite Tess to Thanksgiving.” So he wrote a letter instead.

“I thought, I’ve gone through all those years fighting to keep it all balanced. Here it was, coming at me again, the same thing. I had to get on with my own life. But I never fell out of love with him.”

Next Part of the Traveling without Traveling Itinerary
London: LeRoy’s Waterloo Bridge
Paris: Truffaut’s Last Metro

grateful (COUNT=1314)

DSC00389

We are going through his old photographs as part of the minimization process and found some interesting things. He took the one on the left when he was in high school and a friend took the one on the right. Along with pocket ninja, these will be the only decorative elements in the bedroom


img src=thelittleblackcoffeecup

When Neo Coffee Bar first opened, we went for coffee and I had a slice of the matcha cake and it was nice. These days, we go there at least once a month because watching the dusting of the choux is just mesmerizing. This weekend, I got half a roll of the london fog cake for mum’s birthday and it was amazing. Like sniffing bergamot rind and drinking cold pressed bergamot oil. At the same time

Also found an interesting film in the Bloor Cinema newsletter: “I always dreamed of returning to Italy”